Good, but…

When I started this book, the narrator explains that Joan of Arc is a hoax, that it is in fact Joan of Bourbon and that in the end another one will be burned. The purpose of this scenario was to give Charles VII back the crown. This assertion, at odds with the historians’ version, annoyed me.
Similarly, the vocabulary is too modern and becomes anachronistic.
I closed the book, and did not return to it until a few weeks later.

The Hundred Years’ War is over, and the dissolved armies have partly returned home. The rest were formed into dreaded armed bands: the truck drivers and skinners who terrorized the populations.
Charles VII and his son Louis, the Dauphin, are at war. The latter wants to base his power on Albi.
It is by means of these seasoned men that Louis’s followers develop their strategy, without any hesitation…
It is all this strategy and its implementation that we are following.
The men are practically the only protagonists of this book.
The Inconvenient bride appears only in chapter 15, and again in a very secondary role. She quickly gives way to soldiers and battles. On the other hand, we understand that she is the narrator.
She only has a real role in chapter 40 (the book contains 45). So she makes herself wait for.